Post Info TOPIC: Mysore's no longer for the retired
Shankar Sharma

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Mysore's no longer for the retired
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Mysore is a good place to live and bring up children. Depending on people's perspective, it used to be 'a big village', has 'a laid back life style', 'nightmare for employment' etc. But now it is growing fast, and after Bangalore, has reached a point of saturation. The IT industry boom is fast spreading to Mysore, and the effect can be seen in the huge increase in real estate prices, number of vehicles, people from other parts of the country and the world, comercialism, crimes, noise and pollution, etc. 
I am considering whether cities like Mysore, (certainly not Banglaore, Mumbai, Delhi etc,) are the correct places to live for those who have no essential need to stay there, unlike students or those employed there etc. Won't it be better that the retired people, or people like me who can work from home with a computer move to rural areas, reduce the pressure on the infrastructure here, and help the rural population in whatever way we we can?
It is essential that we keep Mysore as a cultural capital with a knowledge based and service based economy, with a sustainable ecology, and well planned growth with adeqaute infrastructure.

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Dr Y N I Anand

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True, Mysore is growing. However, to expect the city to reach anywhere near even quarter mark of Bangalore is unrealistic as far as growth of IT companies is concerned. It is true that a few companies have purchased land in Mysore. But if the information is correct, barring Infosys, others have purchased purely with the intention of keeping their money safe rather than starting any industry. The growth of other industries during the last two decades speaks volumes of the work atmosphere prevailing at Mysore. Most of the industries have closed down mainly because of militant trade unionism. A case in point is that the former Atlantic Mills (former former KR Mills).

Coming to the escalation in the real estate prices, it is a natural phenomenon everywhere and Mysore is no exception. For those pensioners like me who were allotted sites in the seventies, it does not make any difference since the value is only notional. We could not care as to what happens after our departure from this world!

Hence I personally feel that it is still a long way to go before Mysore becomes really "Polluted".

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Bhamy V Shenoy

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My thinking goes long the lines of Sri Sharma. I have seen the degradation of Mysore in the last 19 yeras since I moved into the city. This has happened despite many large companies closing and not many companies moving in (infosys, Wipro are very recent entries). This has happened despite not having any appreciable total increase in number of companies (this is based on anecdotal observation and not actul data collection) .

Imagine if Bangalore's overflow does move to Mysore, what will happen to the congestion, water supply needs, garbage collection problems etc. None of our planners have even started to think about it. At best they are extrapolating using the old data. This is likely to be a total failure.

We need some out of the box type thinking.

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raghotham

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E venthough mysore (Oldarea) is sorrounded by rivers  within 20 kms distance ,tyhere is no water supply.and old loxalities have to depend upon bore well water. This is just because ofNobody knows.  When the civic authorities cannot coprup to cater to the needs of people of old localities needs ,why they should allow to grow many layouts. new localities comingup and authoritirs are not copingup with the demands of old existing localities ,because of political reasons.


Thisw is only an example.


 Who is having a map of old existing pipe lines ? When it was laid?


Mysore,tyhere is attraction.But it is loosing its name ,because of bad vision and approiate action by authorities to maintain standards required.



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shankar prasad

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Dear Friends,


I agree with both Mr. Anand and Mr. Shenoy. It is still a long way to go, but the moment is happening but a bit slowly (fortunately for us old Mysoreans).


I am sure there will be a correction on the land prices. I meant only a correction but not a downward slide, that may not happen. But a downward trend may set in as far as the apartment prices are concerned.


As regard to the planning I agree with Mr. Shenoy, but I want the group to come up with a solution rather than highlighting the problem. Lets the take the case of Ideal Jawa. No doubt the flats will be a sell out that means there is a demand for flats. So, if not at that place where else, if at the same place how. So it is better to come out with these two suggestions rather than out-rightly rejecting the project. I am sorry I am writing this based on the media reports, if my assumption is contrary to reality, I am happy.


shanks



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Thandava

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It is amusing to note that a few 'retired folks' are getting touchy when Mysore is looked upon as a haven for retired people. I see nothing wrong when people retire and come to Mysore to spend the rest of their lives. But the problem arises when they get restless and become vocal about non-problems and non-issues.

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Om Prakash

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I have been reading the blog columns and replies in this site. In the former, the topics range from 'why a bunch from IT Forum are not chasing the hapless visitors from Germany to earn a buck or two dangling IT in front' to an anectode about that arch self-promoter Tharoor whom the Security Council members shunned decisively recently. What these have to do with Mysore Heaven knows!! Most of the folks who reply seem to be buddies of GVK -all retired men joining in unison to get their lines out! Sounds like ' Mysore is really for the retired'!!!

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SANJAY

Date:
Delimitation of Wards
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How Constituency Boundaries are drawn up

Delimitation is the redrawing of the boundaries of parliamentary or assembly constituencies to make sure that there are, as near as practicable, the same number of people in each constituency. In India boundaries are meant to be examined after the ten-yearly census to reflect changes in population, for which Parliament by law establishes an independent Delimitation Commission, made up of the Chief Election Commissioner and two judges or ex-judges from the Supreme Court or High Court. However, under a constitutional amendment of 1976, delimitation was suspended until after the census of 2001, ostensibly so that statesí family-planning programs would not affect their political representation in the Lok Sabha and Vidhan Sabhas. This has led to wide discrepancies in the size of constituencies, with the largest having over 25,00,000 electors, and the smallest less than 50,000.Delimitation exercise, with 2001 census data released on 31st December 2003, is now under process.


Shortly there will be Online Polling shortly at the new website mysoredirectory.com where in users can choose the area / location and find out who the candidate is and then they can cast their online selction of candiates.


Regards,


SANJAY



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